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Happy Thanksgiving!

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These are my goals for tomorrow's Thanksgiving holiday. 
Thank you so much for spending time with me this year. I am truly grateful for each of you.  
Editing for Grammarphobes will return next week.
Cheers, friends.
Karen

Editing for Grammarphobes: Exceptions

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





I before E, except after Cis probably the most famous spelling rule in the English language. We all can recite it, usually in the sing-song, child-like way we learned it, but do you remember the exceptions?

Yes, neighbor and weigh, which sometimes are added at the end of the mnemonic device. 

Any others?

Well, as it turns out, there are many. I found an article by Bob Cunningham, “Exceptions to the rule ‘I before E except after C,’” on the alt.usage.english newsgroup website years back. Here are some of the words Cunningham mentioned.

beige
heinous
veil
vein
weight
codeine
conscience
foreign
heir
weird

Rules are interesting, aren’t they? As soon as one is formalized, there is always an exception.


EFG Digest

Love all the grammar tips, but don’t have time to check the blog every week? Subscribe to…

Titillating Grammar Facts About Words that Start with ’T’

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?


Getting back to our alphabetical listing of grammar issues, today we discuss words that begin with the letter t.

It’s been a few weeks since I covered “Avoiding Sticky Situations with Words that Begin with 'S.'” (Click here, here, and here for that three-part series.)

While t doesn’t have quite as many grammar issues, there are definitely enough for two blog posts.

Let’s begin, shall we?



Tantalizing, titillating

According to the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), something that is tantalizing “torments us because we want it badly, and it is always out of reach.” If something is titillating, it “tickles us pleasantly, literally or figuratively.”


Thankfully

"...traditionally means 'appreciatively; gratefully,'" CMS cites. It's not a substitute for thank goo…

'Very Fine and Moving Reads'

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER

This week, I received such a wonderful review of all three Bibliophiles books, I just had to share. My thanks to Beverly George for her kind words.






I’ve read the trilogy of books written by Karen Wojcik Berner, and I so enjoyed the women I met in her book club, the Bibliophiles, that I’ve bought her Christmas story, "A Bibliophile Christmas," as well, but I’m saving it for the day after Thanksgiving.

I’ve read my share of books about the relationships between female characters and their ties with their families, their friends, their jobs, their aspirations, and their self-realization. However, I found the women I met in Berner’s book club as more real, more like my own friends, because in “real life,” the endings aren’t always resolved the way we anticipate or hope for. Instead, we change or are changed, we resolve and adapt, we reset our goals, and happily or not, we move on. That’s the formula that makes Berner’s books very fine and moving read…

Things That Go Bump in the Night

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?



Halloween is a huge deal in my family. We decorate the entire house, both inside and out. My husband is a master character maker. Here are a few of his creations that adorn our front yard.





Ours is the house where the kids start their trick or treating excursions. Last year, we had over 200 kids ring our doorbell, from sweet little toddlers to “let’s do this while we can” teenagers. It’s great fun. 

This week in Editing for Grammarphobes, I thought I’d take a stab at luring you to the dark side as we discuss some Halloween myths and the true stories behind them.




Do vampire bats really exist?

The San Diego Zoo has a fascinating web page about bats. Did you know that “out of nearly 1,000 bat species, only three feed on blood, and it is usually that of cattle?” The site also states that,…

Suffixes on Jerseys are Just Plain Wrong

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?


I don’t know if you watch football, American football, that is, for my friends across the pond, but I’ve noticed something over the last few years that just drives me crazy…grammatically. 

The National Football League has it’s share of problems, and I don’t want you to think I take them lightly, but since this is Editing for Grammarphobes, today I only want to discuss one— suffixes on jerseys. 

Look around any football game, and you’ll most surely see a Jr. or a III sewn on after a player’s last name.

Does that look right to you?




It’s not. 

Suffixes like Jr.,Sr., and Roman numerals should not be on football or any sports jerseys. They are intended to differentiate the younger family member from the older. Since the older is not playing football on the team with his son, suffixes are n…

Me and I Are Not Interchangeable

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





Have you ever written a sentence and thought it doesn’t look right? If you’re like me, it’s happened more times than you can count. Here are a few instances that might be the culprits. 


Me or I?

Most people know that I is a subject, as in the following example.

My husband and I went to the theater.

Pretty standard, right?

The problem comes when writing this kind of sentence.

Yes: If you have any problems, please let Linda or me know. 

Should it be Linda or I or Linda or me?

It’s definitely Linda or me. Why? If you reverse the structure of the sentence, using I makes no sense. 

No: Please let I know if you have any problems.

Yes: Please let me know if there are any problems.


e.g. or i.e.

Many people use the abbreviations of e.g. or i.e. as synonyms, but that’s not correct. An abbreviation for…